Nor-Cal Wolf Dogs

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What is a Wolf Dog?

 

What is a Wolf dog

Wolfdog From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Not to be confused with Wolfhound (disambiguation). Wolfdog A Saarlooswolfhond Other names Wolf–dog hybrid Wolf hybrid [hide]Traits [show]Classification and standards Not recognized by any major kennel club Dog (Canis lupus familiaris) A wolfdog (also called a wolf–dog hybrid or wolf hybrid) is a canid hybrid resulting from the mating of a wolf (various Canis lupus subspecies) and a dog (Canis lupus familiaris). The term "wolfdog" is preferred by most of the animals' proponents and breeders because the domestic dog recently was taxonomically recategorized as a subspecies of wolf. The American Veterinary Medical Association and the United States Department of Agriculture refer to the animals as wolf–dog hybrids.[1] Rescue organizations consider any dog with wolf heritage within the last five generations to be a wolfdog, including some established wolfdog breeds.[2] In 1998, the USDA estimated an approximate population of 300,000 wolfdogs in the United States (the highest of any country world-wide), with some other sources giving a population possibly as high as 500,000.[1] In first generation hybrids, gray wolves are most often crossed with wolf-like dogs (such as German Shepherd Dogs, Siberian Huskies, and Alaskan Malamutes) for an appearance most appealing to owners desiring to own an exotic pet.[3] Because wolfdogs are genetic mixtures of wolves and dogs, their physical and behavioral characteristics cannot be predicted with any certainty.

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